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Gilded Age Archives - SHGAPE

The Met Gala Was Not the Fancy Dress Ball Historians Were Hoping For

Posted: May 12, 2022

By Dr. Einav Rabinovitch-Fox May 12, 2022 Last Monday, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City returned to its “First Monday at May” tradition, or as it is commonly known: the Met Gala. Drawing media attention and fashionistas from around the world, the Gala is the annual fundraising event for the museum’s Costume […]

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HBO’s The Gilded Age: A Disappointingly One-Sided Depiction of a Complex Era

Posted: March 29, 2022

By Dr. Nancy C. Unger and Dr. Christopher McKnight Nichols March 29, 2022 This review contains small spoilers. Our co-edited collection, A Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Wiley (Wiley Blackwell, 2017), will be released in an updated, paperback edition this spring. As scholars who have long been immersed in this pivotal period, […]

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Launching the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Podcast

Posted: September 21, 2021

By Dr. Michael Patrick Cullinane September 21, 2021 During the first COVID lockdown, in April 2020, a query flashed across my computer screen as I scrolled through H-Net: “Can anyone recommend any podcasts devoted specifically to the History of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era?” As an avid podcast listener, I should have been able […]

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Using Microhistory to Tell a Whale of a Tale

Posted: February 9, 2021

By Dr. Daniel Gifford February 9, 2021 Discovering Microhistory Although it was many years ago, I still vividly remember microhistory week in my graduate research and methods course. When employing microhistory, the historian uses a small event or story to illuminate much larger contexts and historical trends. And, as Duane Corpis suggests, one of microhistory’s […]

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Geographical Knowledge and Networks of Migration in the Post–Civil War South

Posted: November 5, 2019

By Dr. Keith McCall Emancipation introduced massive demographic shifts within the U.S. South, and with them came cultural, social, and political changes. These trends and transformations were driven by the hundreds of thousands of freedpeople who left their places of enslavement and their old neighborhoods to strike out for new locations where, they believed, they […]

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A Woman Ahead of Her Time: Augusta Lewis Troup and Local Women’s Activism in New York City and New Haven, Connecticut

Posted: September 11, 2019

by Dr. Kelly Marino With centennials in 2019 and 2020 approaching, scholars are working to present the suffrage movement and its legacy in new ways. To date, most studies focus on national or state leaders who directed major organizations or accomplished well-known achievements. They often overlook local activism and less publicized campaigns that broadened the […]

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Coxey’s Army of 1894 and the State of Populist Studies

Posted: June 26, 2019

by Dr. Wesley Bishop Jeffrey Ostler once stated that the contentious field of Populist studies was, “one of the bloodiest episodes in American historiography.” The historiographical debate over Populism is, to say the least, long and nuanced. Historians as different as Richard Hofstadter, Walter Nugent, Lawrence Goodwyn, Elizabeth Sanders, Michael Kazin, John Judis, Jan-Werner Muller, […]

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Interview with SHGAPE President Al Broussard

Posted: May 24, 2019

Below we share an interview with our new SHGAPE president, Dr. Albert S. Broussard. Dr. Broussard is a professor of History at Texas A&M University, where he has taught since 1985. He will serve as SHGAPE president from 2019-2021. Could you tell us a little bit about your scholarship? My recent scholarship explores civil rights, […]

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“A Place Among Original Investigators:” Walter Wyckoff, Alfred Pierce, and Me

Posted: March 5, 2019

by Beau Driver Most historians have felt the thrill of discovery at some point while in the archives. There is a rush that comes with finding something new. For me, it has often felt as though I was suddenly taking an active role in the history that I study. I’ve experienced some of these moments […]

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The Greatest Show on Earth: Power, Spectacle, and Performance in the Traveling Circus

Posted: February 19, 2019

by William J. Hansard (Cover Image: This building in Troy, New York, has been plastered with posters advertising the Ringling Brothers circus, demonstrating the extremes to which circuses would go to stake their claim. Image courtesy of the Ringling Museum Archives. The author is indebted to the archives staff at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of […]

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