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Gilded Age Archives - SHGAPE

Using Microhistory to Tell a Whale of a Tale

Posted: February 9, 2021

By Dr. Daniel Gifford February 9, 2021 Discovering Microhistory Although it was many years ago, I still vividly remember microhistory week in my graduate research and methods course. When employing microhistory, the historian uses a small event or story to illuminate much larger contexts and historical trends. And, as Duane Corpis suggests, one of microhistory’s […]

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Geographical Knowledge and Networks of Migration in the Post–Civil War South

Posted: November 5, 2019

By Dr. Keith McCall Emancipation introduced massive demographic shifts within the U.S. South, and with them came cultural, social, and political changes. These trends and transformations were driven by the hundreds of thousands of freedpeople who left their places of enslavement and their old neighborhoods to strike out for new locations where, they believed, they […]

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A Woman Ahead of Her Time: Augusta Lewis Troup and Local Women’s Activism in New York City and New Haven, Connecticut

Posted: September 11, 2019

by Dr. Kelly Marino With centennials in 2019 and 2020 approaching, scholars are working to present the suffrage movement and its legacy in new ways. To date, most studies focus on national or state leaders who directed major organizations or accomplished well-known achievements. They often overlook local activism and less publicized campaigns that broadened the […]

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Coxey’s Army of 1894 and the State of Populist Studies

Posted: June 26, 2019

by Dr. Wesley Bishop Jeffrey Ostler once stated that the contentious field of Populist studies was, “one of the bloodiest episodes in American historiography.” The historiographical debate over Populism is, to say the least, long and nuanced. Historians as different as Richard Hofstadter, Walter Nugent, Lawrence Goodwyn, Elizabeth Sanders, Michael Kazin, John Judis, Jan-Werner Muller, […]

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Interview with SHGAPE President Al Broussard

Posted: May 24, 2019

Below we share an interview with our new SHGAPE president, Dr. Albert S. Broussard. Dr. Broussard is a professor of History at Texas A&M University, where he has taught since 1985. He will serve as SHGAPE president from 2019-2021. Could you tell us a little bit about your scholarship? My recent scholarship explores civil rights, […]

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“A Place Among Original Investigators:” Walter Wyckoff, Alfred Pierce, and Me

Posted: March 5, 2019

by Beau Driver Most historians have felt the thrill of discovery at some point while in the archives. There is a rush that comes with finding something new. For me, it has often felt as though I was suddenly taking an active role in the history that I study. I’ve experienced some of these moments […]

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The Greatest Show on Earth: Power, Spectacle, and Performance in the Traveling Circus

Posted: February 19, 2019

by William J. Hansard (Cover Image: This building in Troy, New York, has been plastered with posters advertising the Ringling Brothers circus, demonstrating the extremes to which circuses would go to stake their claim. Image courtesy of the Ringling Museum Archives. The author is indebted to the archives staff at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of […]

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Race, Privilege, and the Problem of the Subaltern Franco-American

Posted: January 29, 2019

by Patrick Lacroix   When the Payette family moved to northern New York some time around 1850, the mass migration of French Canadians to the United States was in its infancy.[1] This movement of people from the St. Lawrence River valley continued for the better part of a century, with brief interruptions in the 1870s […]

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The Weather Forecast Company and the Business of Prediction

Posted: September 10, 2018

In October 1903, the Weather Forecast Company of St. Paul, Minnesota, printed a testimonial from the editor of the St. Paul Dispatch endorsing the company’s predictions as “an unqualified success” and the newspaper’s most popular feature.[1] The Dispatch, which claimed to be the only newspaper west of the Atlantic coast to have its own commercial […]

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Bedeviled Reconciliation: Ambrose Bierce’s Civil War

Posted: July 18, 2018

by Donald Thomas Hickey Historians measure change over time in many different ways. When examining the cultural history of the American Civil War Era, for example, analysis of popular literature from Harriet Beecher Stowe’s incendiary Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) to Jefferson Davis’ turgid The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881) reveals the conflicting […]

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